I’d have to create it, so give me time. My comment was that of stock trader who looks at such matters on a daily basis and gets a “feel” for them over time.

There used to be an active market strategy that used insider trading as a barometer. In other words, if the insiders were buying, you should buy; and the reverse is also true.

That strategy started to go away with “blackout” dates. I don’t know what Canadian regs are vis a vis the canadian exchange, but in the US, corporate executives are prohibited from trading during certain windows, and *most* (not all, but most) major corporations prohibit their insiders from trading before and after release of quarterly statements; some (if not most) will also enforce a blackout period on an ad hoc basis if some compelling event expected to affect stock prices is about to occur.

Each corporation decides on their own about this, but in one example that I am familiar with, the insiders can only trade during a two week window each quarter, just after the quarterly results are filed. This pretty much disables the ability of the insiders to goose the stock for their own profit.

Let me see what sort of data I can gather on the larger issue. If I can’t find any data on insider activity on the SEC site, I’ll have to pull a couple of specific corporations and use them as a proxy. Doing it for more than a couple of corproations would require more time than I have.

Free markets, free minds. Question all narratives. If you think one political party is right and the other party is evil, the problem with our politics is you.

Free markets, free minds. Question all narratives. If you think one political party is right and the other party is evil, the problem with our politics is you.