So this guy did a PR exercise on TV a few years ago, and you think that means he’s wonderful.

First off, if you want to talk to me, respond to what I said, not some fucking made up version of what I said. (I apologize for being short, but I’ve already hit my tolerance of assholes today.)

I said that WHAT HE DID FOR HIS EMPLOYEES ON THAT SHOW WAS IMPRESSIVE. I don’t know anything else about him, so I couldn’t say in any way, manner, or form of whether he is “wonderful” or not, in the broad sense that we might use that term to describe a person with a lifetime of good works, or the like. Couldn’t say. With the cameras off, he may very well be the biggest asshole on the planet. So let’s lay off the straw men, shall we?

Which is where I want to take issue with your basic claim: “there’s no scenario you can create where the poor and middle class get richer while the rich get poorer.” Nonsense. Here’s a scenario <snip>

Sorry. I should have mentioned that I was referring to sound economic principles and the need to do what’s best overall in an economy. Some hypothetical Robin Hood scheme where somebody raids the bank accounts of the top .1% and throws it out of a helicopter is not “sound economic policy”.

During the New Deal period, the rich got considerably poorer.

Yes, that period is known as the “Great Compression”, and ranged from about mid WW2 to about 1965, when the top 1% wealth levels leveled out until the late 1980’s, then turned up again.

Their taxes were far, far higher than either today or the previous period, their wealth and dominance faded for a while.

If you’re referring to marginal rates, they stayed high until the mid 1980’s. However, the effective rates paid by the rich were about the same before, during, and after Reagan. That fact makes the association of marginal tax rates to the Great Compression, as the period is called, rather questionable. I have no doubt they contributed *some* during the beginning of the Compression, but economies are complex things, and there were other factors involved as well.

It was the greatest expansion of prosperity in US history.

I’d personally go with the post WW1 recession followed by the Roaring 20’s, but that’s a somewhat subjective call. Others would point to the 1982 period ending with the dot-com bust.

This aspiration stuff he’s talking about is idiotic.

If you think we’re better off as a society if we’re NOT aspirational…..sorry, that’s simply nuts.

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Data Driven Econophile. Muslim, USA born. Been “woke” 2x: 1st, when I realized the world isn’t fair; 2nd, when I realized the “woke” people are full of shit.

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